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British Hydroid Zoophytes Forgotten Books

British Hydroid Zoophytes

Forgotten Books

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781332123056
Paperback
52 pages
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Excerpt from British Hydroid ZoophytesIn October, 1891, the Rev. J. W. Tottenham gave his munificent gift of his private Museum to the Museum, and after the removal which was carried out by me, Mr. Rufford threw himself vigorously into the task ofMoreExcerpt from British Hydroid ZoophytesIn October, 1891, the Rev. J. W. Tottenham gave his munificent gift of his private Museum to the Museum, and after the removal which was carried out by me, Mr. Rufford threw himself vigorously into the task of arranging the specimens. Geology and Conchology and kindred forms of life had his peculiar care. Conchology was well represented in the Tottenham collection.At an early stage of the history of the Museum, the Bradnam collection of local fossils from the Town Hall formed part of the original nucleus, to this was added the Beckles fossils, mostly from the Wealden strata. A strong reinforcement was now to be added to our local collection by the loan of Mr. Ruffords private collection, which being added to from time to time, has given a marked geological character to the Museum, and caused it to be respected by geologists and men of science who visit the town.At the opening of the Museum in the Brassey Institute, on Tuesday, August 16th, 1892, I made a few remarks from the platform in which after mentioning donors and lenders I said, I must now turn to those who have given what is perhaps as valuable as money - that is time and dearly-bought knowledge. I must in the first place mention Mr. P. Rufford, our Hastings geologist, a gentleman well known in the scientific world for his researches amongst our Wealden flora- this gentleman has given up nearly his entire time since the month of May to arranging our specimens, both geological and otherwise. As I have been intimately associated with him during the last few months I can say that our Museum could scarcely have taken shape without his single-minded enthusiasm for science.Mr. Smith Woodward, representing the Geological Department of the British Museum, referred to the discoveries of Messrs. Charles Dawson and Philip Rufford in the Wealden strata, and stated there was evidence that very soon their work would surpass that of Gideon Man tell, the great Sussex geologist.On November 17th, 1893, Mr. Rufford was unanimously elected a member of the Museum Committee, from which time lie became one of its most useful and energetic members, identifying himself thoroughly with its interests, and sparing neither time or trouble in any work he might set himself to accomplish.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.